Something You Need, Something to Read, Something for Fun: Purposeful Christmas Giving in Just Three Presents

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When my children were young, there was a financially tight year where I could only manage to spend $5 per kid for Christmas.  What could I possibly get for $5 per kid that would make for a happy Christmas morning?

About the same time I either heard or read about a family that limited the Christmas gifts in their family to only three since Jesus received three gifts: gold, frankincense, and myrrh.

I decided that buying three gifts would be a great challenge with my low budget.  As I was shopping for the three gifts, I found myself wanting to vary the kinds of gifts I gave and so I started “something you need, something to read, and something for fun.” These categories gave some purposeful meaning to what little I could buy with my $5 per kid limit.

That was 8 years ago. Now I have more than $5 to spend per kid, but each year I have stuck to the three categories.

 

Something You Need

One year I found bathrobes on sale to give to the kids. Once I got my crafty son some Scotch tape since he always needed it for crafts (and I needed him to have his own, too, so he didn’t keep using mine!)

Other ideas from past years:  flashlights, hair care kit with a new hairbrush, hair spray, hair gel, and hair accessories, new desk chair (this was a great score from Craigslist!)

Something to Read

Most of the time, this means books. Usually I buy used so I can give more for less. I can find inexpensive used books at a library book sale or yard sale. If I want something in particular, betterworldbooks.com has some great sales usually less than $4 per book and free shipping. Ollies Bargain Outlet has a great book section as well.

I don’t always give just one book. Sometimes it’s a pile of books or a series. For my daughter who struggles with reading, I often do a coffee table book so there are lots of pictures. Last year her book was a celebration of the life of Princess Diana. But you don’t need to do a book. My husband gave me a Kindle e-reader one year. You could do a magazine or newspaper subscription.

Something for Fun

The first year, I made teddy bears with supplies I already had. This went a long way for me keeping in my budget! My kids are still young enough that “something for fun” usually means a toy.  Legos are a big hit. And dolls are great for my girls. Opening just one toy means that particular toy is cherished on Christmas morning!

As the kids get older, the “something for fun” will branch out beyond toys. And I can take into consideration each one’s personal definition of fun.

Other Ideas

I’ve heard of other families doing something similar and adding on more categories like “something to wear.” Some friends also give “something to do” meaning a game or craft kit. Maybe you have an idea of a category that would fit your family!

“Something you need, something to read, something for fun” gives me a simple plan to follow for Christmas shopping and giving.  It’s also a subtle way to point to the Savior who is the original receiver of three Christmas gifts and the ultimate gift giver.

White silhouette nativity scene

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We Stopped Giving our Kids Birthday Presents

I was tired of tripping over toys! My four kids had so many. Some they had outgrown but nostalgia had prevented them from passing the toys along. Some were only played with when I held it up and said “are we done with this toy yet?” followed by a chorus of “oh, no, that’s our favorite.” I tried to be sneaky and scoop forgotten toys into an unmarked cardboard box. Just when I was sure those toys had been permanently forgotten, I would hear “has anyone seen my…?”

Since my plans for downsizing were continually foiled, I redirected my energy to prevent further accumulation. Each birthday we amassed more from relatives and friends. It was like the toys had babies to mark the days I had babies. Only I reproduced one baby at a time. The toys multiplied like rabbits.

One day I announced that this year Dad and I would not be giving them presents, but instead they could have a Birthday Experience of their choice. Everyone froze. Then came the exclamations of “what!!!!???” and scowls with furrowed brows. I quickly moved on to explain the Birthday Experience as their choice of celebration or activity that our immediately family would happily do together. I waited a moment to let the idea take root and bloom into praise of my genius idea, but the tight lips and narrow eyes remained. So I further stated that they still would get presents from extended family. Only then did their bodies relax with a relieved sigh.

Six weeks later the first family birthday of the year came. Caroline, the six-turning-seven year old, thought about the birthday parties she had attended and remembered several where the children had bounced on inflatable slides and obstacle courses in a large two-roomed gymnasium. Other kids got this experience for their birthday so she wanted this, too. I reserved our time slot for a glow in the dark open bounce time and had a great time! Even though we didn’t pay the extra $150 for the party room with the inflatable birthday throne and paper crown, Caroline felt sufficiently celebrated. The first birthday experience of the year was a success and now the other three children were busily brainstorming the possibilities for their own Birthday Experiences.

Molly, the five-turning-six year old, remembered that she had enjoyed roller skating when she was four years old and wanted to do it again. I looked back on that day, too, and remembered her shuffling around the rink like a preschool pro not being bothered at all that Dad and I couldn’t skate with her since we were helping the other three children when we weren’t falling down ourselves.

The day before we had planned to go roller skating, Molly found me in the kitchen and announced that she wanted to go to Chuck E. Cheese because Caroline thought it would be a good idea. I blurted out “Oh, no. We are going to go roller skating. This is YOUR experience, not Caroline’s!”

The next day we laced up and shuffled our inexperienced selves onto the rink. After managing one loop around with my two older girls hanging on me, I came back to see Molly limp on the rink floor crying. Apparently two years of growth can do a number on one’s center of gravity. As I skated up to her she screamed through her tears, “I told you I wanted to go to Chuck E. Cheese!”

So we turned in our skates after having been there for about 15 minutes and headed off to Chuck E. Cheese where we did, indeed, see Molly have a happy birthday, her smile widening with each gold coin plunked into a slot.

A week later Evelyn, the eight-turning-nine year old, had her birthday. She is a “go big or go home” child. Her Birthday Experience was no different. She wanted to spend the night in a hotel since she had never been in one before. I booked a hotel 10 minutes away with a pool, huge fluffy beds, and a weight room. There was also a television which was a treat since we only have internet at home. Evelyn even invited everyone to eat from the vending machine–her treat–since she insisted that was part of being in a hotel.

Enjoying the hotel pool

After providing the hotel Birthday Experience, which was exponentially more expensive and time consuming than Chuck E. Cheese or bouncy inflatables, I was a little nervous about what Nathaniel, the ten-turning-eleven year old, would choose two months later on his birthday. Would he choose something even more over the top? Would he ask to see the Grand Canyon or go skydiving?

One day he announced that he wanted unlimited screen time for a whole day for the whole family.  His experience also included food (if you can call it that). He wanted sugary cereal: “you know, Mom, the kinds you NEVER buy…Lucky Charms, Cocoa Puffs, Trix, Froot Loops.” That choice dispelled my financial fears. You couldn’t get much cheaper than four boxes of sugary cereal.

The kids ate all 59 servings of sugary cereal that day (minus the crunchy rainbow of artificially-colored processed grains that bounced all over the floor after a bowl had been poured too quickly and minus the non-marshmallows from the Lucky Charms that were passed over by Caroline).  The kids enjoyed their lazy day. An unforeseen bonus: It was QUIET! My husband and I got to play a game and watch a movie together UNINTERUPTED!

What originally began as a tricky ploy to prevent our house from gaining more toys resulted in a gain of a different kind. First of all, we gained family memories. Most of the family time we have together is centered on holidays or vacations. Any other family activities usually get tossed away using the excuse that we do not have time. Tying the family experiences to birthdays forced us to plan time together that we normally wouldn’t have.

Each kid gained an experience of leadership and independence by picking the activity. Usually my husband and I are the leaders and the boss. Since both of us are firstborns this comes naturally to us. I could see each child’s confidence build as we lived their dream day.

We also gained a window into our children’s souls. What do they like to do? Things they’ve done before? New things? Do they want to be out with people or stay in? Are they swayed and motivated by what others have or suggest? Or do they bravely step out to do the unknown?

The next round of birthdays begins soon in our house. The children are already looking forward to choosing an experience again. Not only do they say that to my face, but I’ve even caught them proudly telling their friends that they don’t get presents from Mom and Dad but they get a Birthday Experience. This year my husband and I will jump in on the fun and choose our Birthday Experience, too.  I look forward to gaining more- more time together, more memories, more experiences, more of each of us contributing our individual personalities into our family fun.

 

Functional Fridge Magnets

fridge magnets

My fridge used to be lost under layers of reminders and art and pictures and who knows what else.  Sandra Felton’s book, The Messies Manual, preaches having a clear fridge.  I was apprehensive at first about letting go of displaying the children’s artwork there, but I decided to try it. She was right! It makes such a difference to have the tall, white, surface gleaming in the fluorescent light.

I now have only a couple things on there that give structure to my day.

First there is a chore chart for the kids. Then there are two pretty magnets both with schedules on them. One keeps track of which kid has which special subject on which day like gym, art, library, computers and music. (Funny. Three of them have computer on the same day. What are the chances?)

Secondly I have my chore and cleaning schedule. This way I don’t waste time deciding what to do.  Since this schedule is not on a scrap of paper but affixed to the fridge with a strong magnet it commands my attention and has authority.

To make the magnets, I used some fancy scrapbook paper that I had. Then I glued each onto one of those freebie magnets that you get at the dentist or a festival.

Who Understands Stay at Home Moms? Pastors Do.

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When I was a stay at home mom of preschoolers (I had 4 under 5 at one point) I felt a twinge of jealousy when my pastor-husband would go off to work.  I would grumble inside wishing I could go sit in a quiet office and accomplish things off a to-do list. But the more I listened to what his days really looked like, I realized that a pastor’s day isn’t too different than a stay at home mom’s.

Both:

  • Get interrupted a lot. They go into the day with a to-do list, but if someone needs attention, the to-do list is put aside and people get your full attention. Rightfully so! But it takes practice to make sure people are a priority in your heart above getting things done.
  • Feel the burden of responsibility to make good decisions because it will affect the well-being of those in their care.
  • Experience the joy of witnessing growth!
  • Have work that is never done. There is always something else to do. Not enough hours in the day!
  • Have repetitive duties. Laundry must be done over and over again. Sunday worship comes every week.

Understanding the similarities in our life helped me lose my selfish way of thinking that my life was so much more work than his.  Instead of complaining, I spent my words and time encouraging my husband to build him up. We were on the same team, caring for people and loving them like Christ loves the church. It’s just that the people in my care were much shorter.

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Organization for School Papers for Four Kids

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Now that all four of my children are in school, I needed a system for organizing all their papers that I need to keep or fill out. But in an effort to keep my kitchen counters clear, I did not want any organizational system that would rest on a flat surface.

So I designed this denim pocket organizer out of two pairs of my husband’s old pants. I wanted to finish the project quickly and give it a scrappy look so I did aim for finished edges.

To hang the organizer, I used two clip-style pants hangers and two over-the-door hooks although I suppose command hooks would have worked, too.

Here is a close up of each of the pockets:

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